CV tips to land your next mining job

Whether you are starting out in the mining industry, or you have been building a career for years this guide will help you decide what to include or work towards to make your Curriculum Vitae (CV) – also known as your resumé – a stand-out. A CV is the tool that will help you land an interview, so it is essential your resume is well-written and highlights your strengths and commitment to wanting the job.

Recruiters and employers look for:

  • Detailed experience. No need to be vague – clearly list responsibilities you have had in previous employment. Some action words relating to the mining industry include: prepare; ensure; plan; review; operate; conduct; analyse; develop; schedule; launch; execute; coordinate; inspect; monitor; maintain.
    • For inspiration, LiveCareer has some CV examples for various mining industries.
  • Your qualifications. Include a list of licences you hold (and classes), qualifications and machinery operating tickets relevant to the role, including the date you obtained them and the expiry date (where applicable). Having the right qualifications, tickets or mandatory licences can fast-track your chance of employment. For drivers for example, an HR-X, dump or heavy truck licence is required for entry-level mobile equipment operator positions. There are other compliance certifications that can get you ready for work in the mining industry including courses about elevated work platforms, entering and working in confined spaces, an introduction to mining, or working at heights.  
  • Physical labour experience. If the role you are applying for is a physical one, list previous experience that shows you are capable of hard labour. This can include farming, construction, or volunteer firefighting for example. Likewise, as your job may require physically long hours and rosters away from home, employers will be looking for evidence of good physical health, so list any examples which show your physical interests or interests that help your mental wellbeing. If you’ve taken a fitness test, share your results on your resume. Unlike other 9-5 jobs, health and fitness is often important in mining.
  • Reliability. When you list your work history, ensure you list the dates you started and finished those roles. If you have had any time out from work, have an explanation ready as employers who are looking for stability and reliability will want to know the reason.
  • References. Choose your referees, which are previous supervisors or managers, wisely. They are of vital importance when recommending you for a job, so tell them why the role appeals to you and that way they will know what skills to highlight during a reference check.
  • Your commitment. If you are new to working in mines, be willing to show how committed you are to wanting to work in the industry. Outline any courses you have done to prepare, or skills you have gained that are transferable to the job you are applying for. This includes instances where you have worked in a team, or jobs that require strong communication or problem-solving skills. While you should list this in your resume it is also a strong selling point for your cover letter.
  • Your social media presence. Recruiters and future employers now look online and at social media accounts to see what appears publicly about a person. It is a first impression, so ensure you are happy with the way you appear online or on social media.  You want your CV to do that talking, not anything that may paint you in a negative light on social media.
  • The mining industry is always in need of good talent and the financial rewards are often satisfying too. Hopefully this list gives you some insight into what employers and recruiters look for.

Sources & further reading:

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